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Brand Center

Color

Our colors say a lot about who we are. Our palette helps audiences identify us at a glance, and the way we use color sets the tone for our communications.



Our color palette has two levels: primary and secondary. Each color in this palette has a specific shade and tint as well. Communications should lean heavily on our primary palette, but the secondary palette, tints, and shades may be used to keep layouts from becoming too stale or one-dimensional. 

When using color builds, always use the color values listed on the following pages. They have been adjusted for the best reproduction on screen and in print, and may not match Pantone Color Bridge breakdowns.

To maintain visual consistency across all university materials, only use the colors outlined in this section.

It’s best to use spot colors whenever possible, but if not, please use the four-color process builds detailed in this section, because they match our spot colors as closely as possible

Primary Colors

Our primary colors represent Florida Poly at the highest level, and should be present in all communications.

primary color purple

Purple
PANTONE 2607 C
CMYK 90-99-0-8
RGB 84-46-142
HEX #532d8e

 

primary color white

White
PANTONE White
CMYK 0-0-0-0
RGB 256-256-256
HEX #FFFFFF

 

primary color gray

Gray
PANTONE Cool Gray 3 C
CMYK 0-0-0-35
RGB 177-179-182
HEX #B1B3B5

 

 

 


Secondary Colors

Our secondary palette complements the primary colors and creates flexibility so communications can shift for various needs. Secondary colors should never be used on their own or appear more prominent than the primary palette.

secondary color blue

Blue
PANTONE Process Cyan C
CMYK 100-0-0-0
RGB 0-159-223
HEX #009FDF

secondary color magenta

Magenta
PANTONE 1925 C
CMYK 0-97-50-0
RGB 224-0-77
HEX #E0004D

secondary color teal

Teal
PANTONE 7472 C
CMYK 75-5-48-3
RGB 92-184-178
HEX #5CB8B2

secondary color yellow

Yellow
PANTONE 122 C
CMYK 0-11-80-0
RGB 254-209-65
HEX #FED141

 


 

Tints and Shades

Our tints and shades add depth and create flexibility so communications can shift for various needs. Tints and shades should never be used on their own or appear more prominent than the primary palette.

tint swatches

PANTONE 2073 C
CMYK 39-44-0-0
RGB 175-149-211
HEX #AF95D3
PANTONE 292 C
CMYK 59-11-0-0
RGB 105-179-231
HEX #69B3E7
PANTONE 564 C
CMYK 43-0-23-0
RGB 134-200-188
HEX #86C8BC
PANTONE 106 C
CMYK 0-0-75-0
RGB 249-229-71
HEX #F9E547
PANTONE 709 C
CMYK 0-69-29-0
RGB 239-96-121
HEX #EF6079

shade colors

PANTONE 2695 C
CMYK 88-96-40-43
RGB 46-27-70
HEX #2E1B46
PANTONE 7700 C
CMYK 84-17-0-57
RGB 22-92-125
HEX #165C7D
PANTONE 7721 C
CMYK 89-0-43-65
RGB 0-94-93
HEX #005E5D
PANTONE 136 C
CMYK 0-28-87-0
RGB 255-191-63
HEX #FFBF3F
PANTONE 194 C
CMYK 8-100-55-37
RGB 155-39-67
HEX #9B2744

 


Best Practices

We want our communications to be experienced by all audiences, so thoughtful consideration should be taken when choosing colors for digital communications. Here are a few hints for selecting color combinations that are visually effective, but functionally useful for ADA compliance.

Provide high contrast. 
Pay special attention when using light grays, oranges, and yellows. Check your contrast levels with the WAVE color contrast tool: webaim.org/resources/contrastchecker.
Be color blind friendly. 
Try to avoid placing red and green together, especially in navigation, map graphics, and other wayfinding elements.
Don’t rely on color alone.
Since some users override page colors, color should not be the only way information is conveyed. Make sure information is available even if colors are altered. This can mean adding another cue, such as an underline to show a link, or an icon to reinforce the meaning.